University of Hawaii

Department of Electrical Engineering

COE Distinguished Lecture Series Presents Charlie Bass: "How To Maneuver Venture Capital"

Date: 2007-04-24
Time: 4:30 pm
Location: Jefferson Hall - Asia Room
Speaker: Charlie Bass

Dr. Charlie Bass received his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Hawaii in 1972.  His thesis dealt with the design and implementation of UHTSS, a Time Shared System utilized by the UH Computing Center and the ALOHA project.

After graduation, he accepted a position teaching computer science at the University of California, Berkeley, and in 1975, he joined Zilog, a microprocessor company which developed the Z80; an architecture employed in literally billions of embedded applications.  Subsequently, in 1979, he co-founded Ungermann-Bass, the first networking company to deliver computer independent local networks and the first to go public in 1983.  From 1983 to 1997, Dr. Bass was the Consulting Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University.  In 1989, he formed Bass Associates, a venture capital company specializing in early stage investments.

Seminar:  "How To Maneuver Venture Capital"

After going into hibernation in 2001, Venture Capital (VC) firms are back in business and have lots of money, but to get some of it, you need to show that you can build a large, profitable, and sustainable business--which wasn't really necessary during the "bubble" years.  It starts with the right introduction and an "elevator speech"--in a low-rise building.

More than anything a VC wants to make sure he gets to see a deal and gets to decide whether or not to invest, but how do you maximize your chances of being in the 1% of entrepreneurs who get financed.  Of course, if you have already taken a company public and made your investors lots of money, it's going to be easy.  If not, you better be prepared for an arcane process where "we like this sector" means "we're trying to understand why anyone would invest."  If the prospect of dealing with such unnatural behavior doesn't discourage you, then you may be sufficiently committed and naive to press on, but you still need to be prepared--and that's what this talk is about.

 



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