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University of Hawaii

Electrical Engineering

3D Printing of Functional Electronics and Ingestible Biomedical Devices

Date: 2018-12-06           Add to Google Calendar
Time: 3:00pm-4:00pm
Location: Holmes 287
Speaker: Yong Lin Kong; Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, University of Utah

Abstract:

My research group focuses on the development of 3D printing technologies to create multifunctional structures and devices that cannot be fabricated with conventional fabrication methods. We seek to advance the scientific understanding of the assembly and processing of functional nanomaterials to functionalize a wide range of constructs. We develop a multi-scale, multi-material additive manufacturing approach that is fundamentally free from the constraint of the conventional two-dimensional, top-down fabrication methodologies to achieve a seamless integration of a diverse classes of materials. The freeform fabrication approach could overcome the geometrical, mechanical and material dichotomies between conventional manufacturing technologies and a broad range of three-dimensional systems. As an example, I will first highlight the development of 3D printed quantum-dots light-emitting diode, which extended the reach of 3D printing and demonstrated that active electronic materials and devices can be entirely 3D printed. In the second part of the talk, I will highlight the latest development of a 3D printed gastric resident electronics system, which leverages the significant space and immune-tolerant environment available within the gastrointestinal tract to circumvent the potential complications associated with surgically placed medical implants. Ultimately, we strive to address unmet clinical needs by creating tailorable three-dimensional free-form biomedical devices with 3D printing technologies.


About the Speaker: 

Yong Lin Kong is an Assistant Professor of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Utah (2018-Present). Previously, he was a postdoctoral associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2016-2017), working with Professor Robert S. Langer. He received a B.Eng. in Mechanical Engineering with First Class Honors from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (2010), a M.A. in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University (2012) and a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science from Princeton University (2016) with Michael C. McAlpine and Professor Howard A. Stone. His research is focused on the fabrication of biomedical devices and the printing of nanomaterial-based functional devices. He is a recipient of the Technology Review Innovators Under 35 Asia Award, Materials Research Society Graduate Student Award, the Daniel & Florence Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship, Sayre Graduate Prize, and the HKUST Academic Achievement Medal.


*Contact: Sangwoo Shin (MechE; sangwoos@hawaii.edu, 956-3679)



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